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Raynaud’s Disease symptoms: Does Raynaud’s affect your heart? https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1532770/raynauds-disease-symptoms-does-Raynaud-s-affect-heart-evg
https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1532770/raynauds-disease-symptoms-does-Raynaud-s-affect-heart-evg
<div><img src=”https://cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/11/750×445/1532770.jpg” class=”ff-og-image-inserted”></div><p>You can have primary or secondary Raynaud’s, and which type you have depends on the cause of your condition and the symptoms.</p><p>The Mayo Clinic explains that Primary Raynaud’s, also called Raynaud’s disease, is the most common form.</p><p>Primary Raynaud’s isn’t the result of an associated medical condition and can be so mild that many people don’t seek treatment as it resolves on its own.</p><p>Secondary Raynaud’s (Raynaud’s phenomenon), on the other hand, is caused by an underlying problem such as connective tissue diseases, artery diseases, carpal tunnel syndrome, injuries and certain medications, and this type tends to be more serious.</p><p>If secondary Raynaud’s is severe — which is rare — reduced blood flow to your fingers or toes could cause tissue damage and untreated cases might require removing the affected part of the body.</p> Tue, 07 Dec 2021 17:18:00 +0000 Izzie Deibe
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https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1532770/raynauds-disease-symptoms-does-Raynaud-s-affect-heart-evg


Expert’s stark warning over ‘wave of neurological illness’ to follow Covid infections https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1532566/coronavirus-warning-parkinsons-disease-health
https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1532566/coronavirus-warning-parkinsons-disease-health
<div><img src=”https://cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/11/750×445/1532566.jpg” class=”ff-og-image-inserted”></div><div readability=”35.272058823529″><p>The chronic and short-term complications of coronavirus have remained in sharp focus throughout the pandemic. But as research advances, it’s becoming increasingly apparent that certain patients find their brains continue to bear out the scars of their COVID-19 battles. Data released last year raised the alarm over the cases of three young COVID-19 patients who developed <a data-link-tracking=”InArticle|Link” href=”https://www.express.co.uk/latest/parkinsons-disease” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>Parkinson’s</a> within weeks of contracting the virus. An expert has now warned that many more could be at the perils of the neurodegenerative condition in the coming years.</p></div><div readability=”11.153846153846″><div class=”text-description” readability=”41.953917050691″><p>Kevin Barnham from Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health warned that a wave of neurological illness is set to follow the pandemic.</p><p>“Parkinson’s disease is a complex illness, but one of the causes is inflammation, and the virus helps to drive that inflammation,” explained Miss Barnham.</p><p>“Once the inflammation gets into the brain, it starts a cascade of events which can ultimately lead to Parkinson’s disease.</p><p>“Evidence is already suggesting the triggers for Parkinson’s disease are there with this virus. I believe the risk is real.”</p><p><b>READ MORE: </b><a data-link-tracking=”InArticle|Link” href=”https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1532186/parkinsons-diet-water-avoid-symptoms-evg”><b>Parkinson’s: Exactly how much water you should drink to avoid Parkinson’s symptoms</b></a></p></div></div><div readability=”35.832151300236″><p>“We can’t put a number on it, but with 30 million people worldwide affected by this virus, even a small shift in the risk of getting Parkinson’s would lead to many more people getting diagnosed.</p><p>“We know COVID-19 has short-term effects, but we are releasing more about the potential long-term effects.”</p><p>Data published in November of 2020 were the first to raise the alarm over potential neurological implications of infection with COVID-19.</p><p>The data drew on three separate case reports on relatively young COVID-19 patients who developed Parkinson’s within two to five weeks of contracting the disease.</p><p><b>DON’T MISS:&nbsp;</b></p></div><div readability=”49″><p>The lead author of the article, Patrik Brundin, warned at the time: “If this link is real, we might be in for an epidemic of Parkinson’s disease in the future.”</p><p>The three patients, aged 35, 45 and 58-years-old respectively, all incurred a severe respiratory infection from Covid, which led to their hospitalisation.</p><p>Brain imaging later revealed classic signs of Parkinson’s disease in all three patients.</p><p>“These cases of acute Parkinson’s in patients with COVID-19 are truly remarkable,” noted Mr Brundin.</p></div><div readability=”11.786666666667″><div class=”text-description” readability=”46″><p>“They occurred in relatively young people – much younger than the average age of developing Parkinson’s – and none had a family history of early signs of Parkinson’s prodrome. That is quite a stunning observation.</p><p>“Parkinson’s is normally a very slowly developing disease, but in these cases, something happened quickly.”</p><p>The doctor suggested the virus might make patients susceptible to Parkinson’s by plaguing them with neurological symptoms after infection.</p><p>These typically include brain fog and depressions, which are consistent with damage to the brain and could lead to Parkinson’s.</p></div></div><div readability=”54″><p>Parkinson’s disease is characterised by a gradual shortfall of dopamine in the brain, the hormone responsible for movement in the body.</p><p>This causes problems with body movement, including involuntary tremors and rigidity, both of which can severely compromise quality of life.</p><p>In light of the alarming findings, researchers have suggested patients undergo early tests to pick up symptoms.</p><p>Parkinson’s patients can experience loss of smell up to a decade before the onset of symptoms, so a smell-test screening could open up the window opportunity for early medical intervention, explained doctor Lyndsea Collins-Praino, Head of cognition ageing laboratory at the University of Adelaide.</p><p>Doctor Collins-Praino, added: “The earlier we can detect [the damage] the better our chances of really effective and meaningful therapeutics for individuals.”</p></div> Tue, 07 Dec 2021 12:10:00 +0000 Solen Le Net
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https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1532566/coronavirus-warning-parkinsons-disease-health


How to live longer: The cholesterol-lowering drink to add disease-free years to your life https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1532138/how-to-live-longer-green-tea-cholesterol
https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1532138/how-to-live-longer-green-tea-cholesterol
<div><img src=”https://cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/11/750×445/1532138.jpg” class=”ff-og-image-inserted”></div><div readability=”36″><p>The elements that constitute longevity have long eluded medical circles worldwide. But it is clearer than ever that evading illness is key. Antioxidants boast life-prolonging effects because they rid the body of harmful substances. But some antioxidants, such as those found in green tea are more potent than others.</p></div><div readability=”11.252816901408″><div class=”text-description” readability=”41.867088607595″><p>Green tea is an excellent source of catechins, a potent antioxidant revered for its protective effects against disease.</p><p>Researchers believe that the compounds are responsible for the beverage’s cholesterol-lowering effects, explains the AARP.</p><p>The specific type of catechins found in green tea is ECGC, which is renowned as being one of the most potent.</p><p>One meta-analysis published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggested that green tea significantly reduces total cholesterol, including LDL or “bad” cholesterol.</p><p><b>READ MORE: </b><a data-link-tracking=”InArticle|Link” href=”https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1524347/how-to-live-longer-cholesterol-lower-cranberry-juice”><b>How to live longer: The cholesterol-lowering drink that ‘significantly’ boosts longevity</b></a></p></div></div><div readability=”33.159420289855″><p>A host of studies have also highlighted the life-prolonging effects of ECGC, explaining it may add more than a year of disease-free life.</p><p>In one study performed on rodents, researchers split the young adult mice into three groups to observe the protective effects underpinning ECGC.</p><p>One group served as controls and were offered a standard lab chow diet alongside plain water.</p><p>Another group ate high-fat diets and drank water spiked with fructose, while the third group ate the same diet accompanied with water laced with EGCG.</p><p><b>DON’T MISS:&nbsp;</b></p></div><div readability=”47″><p>Results later revealed that rodents that consumed ECGC performed better in cognitive tests, confirming the neuroprotective effects of the compound.</p><p>A filled cup of brewed green contains around 50 to 100 mg of ECGC.</p><p>Green tea contains the highest concentrations of the compound, which increases with brewing time.</p><p>Separate studies conducted at Oregon State University have suggested the compound has the ability to increase the body’s number of regulatory T cells, which may help protect against autoimmune diseases.</p><p>Researchers found the compound was able to regulate appetite among the rodents following a high fat and high sugar diet.</p></div><div readability=”13.46015936255″><div class=”text-description” readability=”49″><p>In 2020, a study conducted on over 100,000 Chinese participants found those who drank green tea more than three times a week, lived on average 15 months longer than those who did.</p><p>The others of the study wrote: “Habitual tea drinks had 1.41 years longer of cardiovascular disease-free years and 1.26 years longer of life expectancy at the index age of 50.”</p><p>“Tea consumption was associated with reduced risks of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, especially among those consistent habitual tea drinks.”</p><p>EGCG is known to aid with inflammation, weight loss, and prevent heart and brain disease, but it is not the only beneficial compound found in green tea.</p></div></div><div readability=”50″><p>Tea also contains theanine, an amino acid that can relieve stress, and arginine, which also has a relaxing effect.</p><p>“The stress-reducing effect of thiamine and green tea is thought to contribute to the maintenance of mental health and the control of brain ageing in many people,” wrote the authors of one study published in the journal Molecules.</p><p>In doing so, “green tea suppresses brain ageing through the activity of nerve cells by both EGCG and its degradation products, and the reductions in stress achieved by thiamine and arginine.”</p><p>Data highlighting the life-prolonging effects of green tea stem from observational studies to date, so no causal relationship has yet been confirmed.</p></div> Tue, 07 Dec 2021 07:53:00 +0000 Solen Le Net
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https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1532138/how-to-live-longer-green-tea-cholesterol


Omicron variant warning: The surprising age you’re most likely to get Covid mutation https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1531649/Omicron-variant-warning-symptoms-age-evg
https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1531649/Omicron-variant-warning-symptoms-age-evg
<div><img src=”https://cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/11/750×445/1531649.jpg” class=”ff-og-image-inserted”></div><p>She said the “most predominant clinical complaint” was “fatigue for one or two days”.</p><p>Headaches and bodily aches and pains accompanied them, and signs “related to normal viral infection”.</p><p>Although there is little concern amongst adults right now, the NICD has noted rising hospitalisation rates amongst infants aged under two.</p><p>A hospital in Tshwane, in the South African province of Gauteng, documented 52 infant admissions between November 14 and 28.</p> Tue, 07 Dec 2021 15:57:00 +0000 Liam Doyle
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https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1531649/Omicron-variant-warning-symptoms-age-evg


Alzheimer’s: The warm drink that could reduce your risk – the more you drink the better https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1527822/alzheimers-coffee-reduces-risk-in-middle-age
https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1527822/alzheimers-coffee-reduces-risk-in-middle-age
<div><img src=”https://cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/11/750×445/1527822.jpg” class=”ff-og-image-inserted”></div><div readability=”34.025490196078″><p>A recently published study in Australia aimed to quantify the impact of a popular beverage on the development of <a data-link-tracking=”InArticle|Link” href=”https://www.express.co.uk/latest/dementia”>cognitive impairment </a>in aging people. Following 200 people over a decade, the participants who drank greater amounts of coffee saw a significantly reduced risk. Coffee intake was linked to a lower build-up of amyloid protein in the brain, a key marker in the development of <a data-link-tracking=”InArticle|Link” href=”https://www.express.co.uk/latest/alzheimers”>Alzheimer’s disease</a>. The researchers believe this could provide a simple lifestyle change to help people who are at risk.</p></div><div readability=”28.738423028786″><p>Larger amounts of coffee produced increased benefits, although the study did not establish a maximum amount to achieve the health benefits.</p><p>Two cups seem to be a good amount according to the data so far.</p><p>Doctor Gardener explained: “If the average cup of coffee made at home is 240g, increasing to two cups a day could potentially lower cognitive decline by eight percent after 18 months.</p><p>”It could also see a five percent decrease in amyloid accumulation in the brain over the same time period.”</p><p><strong>DON’T MISS:</strong></p></div><div readability=”46″><p>Drinking more coffee saw improvements to several specific areas of cognitive function.</p><p>The most notable was executive function, which affects your ability to construct and carry out plans, exercise self-control and concentrate on tasks.</p><p>Problems with executive function are characterised by difficulty managing tasks, keeping track of belongings and organising thoughts.</p><p>In Alzheimer’s disease, the first symptom is typically problems with memory, although in rare cases it may impact vision or language first.</p></div><div readability=”10.585714285714″><div class=”text-description” readability=”44″><p>The study was not able to collect exhaustive data on how and what types of coffee people were drinking.</p><p>Caffeinated and decaf coffee were both taken by participants and a variety of brewing methods were used.</p><p>Future research might unveil the optimal beverage, whether caffeinated or decaf, milk or sugar and the type of filter used.</p><p>Caffeine has been linked in other studies to reducing cognitive impairment but it may not be the only active ingredient in coffee to produce this effect.</p></div></div><div readability=”48″><p>Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia are one of the leading causes of disability in later life, beating out cancer, heart disease and strokes.</p><p>The burden of care is expected to rise for dementia sharply over the next two decades, according to the Alzheimer’s Society.</p><p>Despite this, they explain dementia research is broadly underfunded compared to conditions such as cancer.</p><p>They say: “For every person living with dementia, the annual cost to the UK economy is over £30,000 and yet only £90 is spent on dementia research each year.”</p></div> Tue, 07 Dec 2021 07:52:00 +0000 Mason Quah
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https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1527822/alzheimers-coffee-reduces-risk-in-middle-age



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