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Millions of Android phones will be blocked from the web, but a solution is on the way http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/daily-express-tech/~3/E3i8CXrmU98/Android-Nougat-Users-Blocked-Secure-Websites-Online
https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/science-technology/1375708/Android-Nougat-Users-Blocked-Secure-Websites-Online
<div><img src=”https://cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/59/750×445/1375708.jpg” class=”ff-og-image-inserted”></div><div readability=”35″><p>Android smartphones stuck on version 7.1.1 Nougat of the mobile operating system or older will be blocked from huge swathes of the internet next year. Android fans were warned about the change back in November, which is due to a root certificate that expires in September 2021.</p></div><div readability=”49.108713692946″><p>The expiration means that large portions of the secure web – websites that use the HTTPS standard and have the padlock symbol in the address bar to let you know that your connection is safe from prying eyes – won’t be accessible from older gadgets.</p><p>According to nonprofit certificate authority Let’s Encrypt, this is a huge problem as a staggering 33.8 percent of Android users on Google Play are still running Android versions older than 7.1.1. At last count, there were 2.5 billion active Android users worldwide.</p><p>So, even though Android users still relying on Android 7.1.1 or older are in the minority – it’s a minority that still counts hundreds of thousands of users in its ranks.</p><p>Thankfully nonprofit Let’s Encrypt has confirmed plans to roll out a solution to this issue. University of Michigan states that Let’s Encrypt is the world’s largest certificate authority and has single-handedly helped double the number of secure websites by providing a free service to make it easier to implement the all-important HTTPS protocol. And now, the firm plans to extend older phones’ compatibility for three years.</p><p><strong>MORE LIKE THIS<br></strong><strong><a data-link-tracking=”InArticle|Link” href=”https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/science-technology/1368070/Android-App-Hackers-Can-Copy-Your-Password-Access-Account” data-name=”These popular Android apps let hackers copy your passwords and more” target=”_blank”>These popular Android apps let hackers copy your passwords and more</a></strong></p></div><div readability=”40.012345679012″><p>In <a data-link-tracking=”InArticle|Link” href=”https://letsencrypt.org/2020/12/21/extending-android-compatibility.html” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>the latest announcement</a>, Let’s Encrypt says it found the workaround “thanks to some innovative thinking from [its] community and [its] wonderful partners at IdenTrust.” The solution created in collaboration with IdenTrust, another certificate authority, will keep everyone connected until 2024.</p><p>Even better, Android smartphone owners won’t need to do a thing. Everything will tick over automatically and their handsets will continue to be able to load secure sites and web apps.</p></div><div readability=”11.502751031637″><div class=”text-description” readability=”45″><p>If they never read this article, these Android users won’t even be aware that there was a possibility of them losing access to some of their most frequently accessed sites.</p><p>In the past, it wasn’t uncommon for Android manufacturers to offer relatively few operating system updates and a number of handsets (typically those with lower price tags) would never be upgraded from the version of Android preinstalled on the device at launch. Thankfully, things have improved since then.</p><p>Samsung, OnePlus and Google have recently pledged to bring three major operating system changes – like the upgrade from Android 10 to Android 11 – to their devices from now on.</p></div></div><p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 23 Dec 2020 05:41:00 +0000 en
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https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/science-technology/1375708/Android-Nougat-Users-Blocked-Secure-Websites-Online


ASDA is selling smart TVs at a ludicrously low price and the deal starts tomorrow http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/daily-express-tech/~3/5BeuiPGhaWk/ASDA-polaroid-smart-TV-price-deal-offer
https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/science-technology/1375857/ASDA-polaroid-smart-TV-price-deal-offer
<div><img src=”https://cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/59/750×445/1375857.jpg” class=”ff-og-image-inserted”></div><div readability=”35″><p>If you fancy treating yourself to cheap new television for Christmas then a trip to ASDA might be in order. The supermarket chain is about to start selling a Polaroid smart TV for just £159. That’s pretty cheap and is actually one of the lowest ever prices for these internet-connected goggle boxes.</p></div><div readability=”48″><p>This television includes full access to online content such as Netflix and there’s Freeview Play integration which means as well as BBC, ITV and Channel 4 you can also tune into channels such as Dave, Sky Arts and Really without paying a monthly subscription fee.</p><p>Now before you get in the car and rush to your local store there are some things to be aware of. Firstly, this offer doesn’t start until Christmas Eve so you’ll need to wait until tomorrow for the discount.</p><p>Then there’s the screen size as the offer is for a 32” display which some may find too small for their needs. Finally, this is not a 4K TV with owners only treated to 1080p HD quality.</p><p>If none that of that bothers you then you may struggle to find anything else quite as cheap as ASDA’s offer which is available in store only.</p></div><p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 23 Dec 2020 06:48:33 +0000 en
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https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/science-technology/1375857/ASDA-polaroid-smart-TV-price-deal-offer


Is it you in this video? If you’re sent this message on Facebook you might be hacked http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/daily-express-tech/~3/0qK-sqBezuY/Facebook-is-it-you-in-this-video-Messenger-hack
https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/science-technology/1375703/Facebook-is-it-you-in-this-video-Messenger-hack
<div><img src=”https://cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/59/750×445/1375703.jpg” class=”ff-og-image-inserted”></div><div readability=”35.88120950324″><p>If you’re sent a DM on <a data-link-tracking=”InArticle|Link” href=”https://www.express.co.uk/latest/facebook” target=”_blank” rel=”tag”>Facebook</a> Messenger asking “is it you in this video” then you need to be on red alert as it’s all part of an elaborate scam that has resurfaced recently. As highlighted by security firm <a data-link-tracking=”InArticle|Link” href=”https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2020/12/18/is-it-you-in-the-video-dont-fall-for-this-messenger-scam/” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>Sophos</a>, this latest Facebook scam is designed to steal a target’s username and password, which can be then be used to spread the con even further. The scam begins simply enough when a Facebook user receives a DM (Direct Message) from one of their friends.</p></div><div readability=”42.539660056657″><p>The private message on Facebook Messenger asks “is it you in this video” and provides what looks like an embedded video you can click play on.</p><p>If this had been sent by anyone else the Facebook user might not fall for the scam, but seeing as the sender is a friend it may trick someone into playing the video.</p><p>However, as Sophos explained – the sender has already had their account taken over by hackers, and this latest DM is all part of the cycle which continues spreading the scam.</p><p>If a Facebook user attempts to click play on the ‘video’ they will instead be redirected to a new web page that looks like a Facebook login screen.</p><p><strong>READ MORE: <a data-link-tracking=”InArticle|Link” href=”https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/science-technology/1367228/WhatsApp-update-iPhone-Android-new-wallpapers” target=”_blank” rel=”tag”>Update WhatsApp if you fancy a fresh new look on Android and iPhone</a></strong></p></div><div readability=”18.565289256198″><div class=”text-description” readability=”59″><p>The giveaway that this is a con, however, is the URL for the page – which instead of being an official Facebook website is clearly a bogus one, which is hosted in Hungary.</p><p>Another sign this website is fake is the webpage uses HTTPS instead of HTTP, with the former protocol being used by major websites to keep visitors safe.</p><p>Seeing as this fake website uses HTTP, the locked padlock icon you would see in the address bar when visiting legitimate websites is not displayed, a further sign that the website the Facebook DM has directed people to is bogus and dangerous.</p><p>If these warning signs aren’t spotted, and a Facebook user ends up entering their login details in then this sensitive information will be handed over to cyber crooks.</p><p>This will not only give scammers access to a target’s Facebook account, but also let them continue spreading the scam by sending the same message to any contacts of the hijacked FB profile.</p><p>Sophos went on to say that there is another aspect of the scam. Once a Facebook username and password has been entered into the fake login page, there will be a short delay before a victim is redirected to another scam.</p></div></div><div readability=”60″><p>These scams don’t appear like they’re being run by the same group of criminals, so they may be trying to pick up affiliate fees for sending victims to other cons.</p><p>Or, it might be a way for crooks to simply buy time so they can quickly access a victim’s account before they realise they’ve been conned and attempt to change their password.</p><p>Advising people on how to stay safe, Sophos said anti-virus and password manager tools can be helpful. They also advised that you should turn on two-factor authentication when this option is available.</p><p>Sophos said: “Use 2FA on any account you can. Adding a second factor of authentication means that the crooks can’t phish your password alone and then access your account. 2FA is a minor inconvenience to you, but a major roadblock for cybercrimimals.”</p><p>Sophos also advised that if you think a friend has been hacked, maybe after receiving a suspicious message, then contact them as soon as possible via another method of communication.</p><p>And if you are alerted by a friend that your account has been compromised don’t delay in trying to secure your account by changing your password.</p><p>Just make sure you head to an official website to change your login details, instead of clicking on any links that you’re sent from a contact.</p></div><p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 23 Dec 2020 07:25:00 +0000 en
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https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/science-technology/1375703/Facebook-is-it-you-in-this-video-Messenger-hack


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